Corbyn hit by early series of Labour resignations

jc-small

Within just hours of Jeremy Corbyn being elected as the new Labour Party leader there have been numerous resignations from the party’s Ministerial spokespeople.

Those already announcing their departure include Tristram Hunt, Emma Reynolds, Yvette Cooper, Liz Kendall, Chris Leslie, Chuka Umunna, Rachel Reeves and Jamie Reed with others expected to stand down later today. Ed Miliband, the former party leader, has also confirmed that he wouldn’t serve in a Corbyn-led Shadow Cabinet.

 

Jeremy Corbyn is the new leader of the Labour Party

jc-small

The Labour Party have confirmed that Jeremy Corbyn has been elected as their new party leader.

Results 1st Stage Members Registered Supporters Affiliated Supporters Total % of Valid Vote
BURNHAM, Andy 55,698 6,160 18,604 80,462 19.0%
COOPER, Yvette 54,470 8,415 9,043 71,928 17.0%
CORBYN, Jeremy 121,751 88,449 41,217 251,417 59.5%
KENDALL, Liz 13,601 2,574 2,682 18,857 4.5%
TOTAL 245,520 105,598 71,546 422,664

 

Three Labour leadership candidates reject Jeremy Corbyn’s call for all-women train carriages

cooper

Yvette Cooper, one of the four candidates for leadership of the Labour Party, has rejected a proposal by Jeremy Corbyn, who is also standing, for all-women carriages to be introduced onto trains.

Cooper said on Twitter:

“Why should we [women] have to shut ourselves away to stay safe?”

She later said in a statement:

“The staff needed to enforce the segregated carriages should be keeping all the carriages safe instead. Transport bosses and police need to do far more to crack down on harassment and abuse – and that means we need more visible police and staff on tubes, trains and platforms, better lighting and CCTV, tough action to follow up abuse (which too often doesn’t happen), and a complete change in culture on buses, railways and tubes”.

Liz Kendall, also standing in the leadership contest, said:

“But I don’t believe that gender segregation is the answer. That’d be an admission of defeat, rather than a sustainable solution”.

Andy Burnham, the fourth candidate for the leadership, said:

“In this day and age we shouldn’t even considering the idea of segregated train travel. As a dad of two young girls, I want to see a proper society-wide strategy on tackling violence against women”.

Anber Raz from the Equality Now group also criticised the proposals saying:

“Having women-only carriages on public transport does not solve the fundamental problem of sexual harassment and hides women away. Instead, the focus should be on ending the harassment and teaching boys and men not to do it, rather than putting the onus on women to ‘stay safe’. The justice system should be held accountable too, to take this issue seriously and pursue prosecutions, thereby sending a strong message that the continued harassment of women and girls will not be tolerated”.

Corbyn’s campaign team said that he had raised the issue only to encourage debate on protecting women and that it was only for discussion at this stage.

Alan Johnson appeals for calm after splits in Labour Party threatened if Corbyn wins leadership

jc-small

Alan Johnson, the former Home Secretary and Shadow Chancellor, has appealed for calm in the Labour party over further rumours of splits if Jeremy Corbyn is elected leader.

Fears of a split have increased in recent days as numerous Labour MPs have said they fear being deselected by members loyal to Jeremy Corbyn. Johnson has appealed for loyalty to whoever is elected leader of the party and confirmed that he would also remain loyal.

Speaking to the Daily Telegraph Johnson said:

“This is an election. If Jeremy Corbyn emerges as the winner I would counsel anyone thinking of splitting or separating to think again”.

Johnson is supporting Yvette Cooper in the leadership contest and although he appealed for calm he also urged restraint from the left of the party. Johnson warned against repeating past mistakes and said:

“I certainly hope that Jeremy and his supporters, particularly the more finger-jabbing intolerant sections of them are not going to try to repeat the 1980s”.

There are four candidates for the Labour leadership who are Andy Burnham, Yvette Cooper, Jeremy Corbyn and Liz Kendall. The results will be announced at a special conference on Saturday 12 September 2015.

Labour Party checking legal position over leadership contest

labour

A spokesman for the Labour Party has confirmed that they have been receiving legal advice over the legality of the current leadership contest. A party spokesman said:

“We have taken legal advice to make sure that the rules are being complied with and that all due diligence as possible was being done”.

The spokesman also confirmed that there were no plans to delay or suspend the leadership contest despite claims that members of other parties had joined under the new £3 rate to cast a vote.

Following the resignation of Ed Miliband in May 2015 the acting leader, Harriet Harman, had said:

“This contest will be run under the new rules we agreed last year: a broad and open contest with one person, one vote. We want as many people as possible to take part. More than 30,000 new members have joined the party in the last few days and I hope many more members and supporters will take this opportunity to have their voice heard”.

The four candidates in the leadership process are Andy Burnham, Yvette Cooper, Jeremy Corbyn and Liz Kendall. The voting process is already underway and the result will be announced at a special conference to be held on Saturday 12 September 2015.

David Miliband warns against the “angry defiance” of Jeremy Corbyn

davidmiliband

David Miliband, the former Labour Foreign Secretary and leadership contender, has said that he is supporting Liz Kendall’s bid to lead the Labour Party.

Writing in the Guardian Miliband said:

“I know from experience the challenge and demands of running in a leadership campaign, so I have good reason to respect the commitment and integrity of all the candidates. I have been struck since the beginning of the campaign by the plain speaking, fresh thinking and political courage of Liz Kendall and the new generation of politicians – Chuka Umunna, Emma Reynolds, Tristram Hunt – who have declared their support for her. From industrial policy to the devolution of power, from housing to education, they got the message from the 2010 and 2015 elections that trying to turn the Labour clock back to the pre-Blair era made no sense”.

Miliband also criticised strongly the policies of Jeremy Corbyn saying:

“The Corbyn programme looks backwards. The pledges of nationalisation, 7p in the pound increases in national insurance for those earning more than £50,000, and equivocation about Britain’s place in the EU are the same ideas that I learned were wrong when I joined the Labour party in 1981”.

Miliband’s intervention came after similar criticisms of Corbyn’s chances from former senior Labour figures including Tony Blair, Alan Johnson and Jack Straw. Gordon Brown also strongly indicated in a speech that economic credibility was crucial in what was seen as a criticism of the Corbyn campaign.

Andy Burnham warns of dangers of Corbyn victory

burnham

Andy Burnham has become the third candidate in the Labour leadership to warn of the dangers of electing Jeremy Corbyn, the remaining candidate for the leadership.

In an interview Burnham said:

“Think carefully before you vote and don’t make Labour a party of protest that is racked by internal divisions rather than focusing on being a proper opposition and taking on the Tories”.

Yvette Cooper and Liz Kendall had both also warned of the dangers of electing Corbyn with Cooper preparing a critique of his policies and Kendall warning about the difficulties of progressing peace in Northern Ireland.

Burnham’s attacks come just a day after he said that criticisms of Corbyn were “misreading the mood of the party”.

The Daily Mirror, the only national newspaper to support Labour at the 2015 General Election, also came out in support of Andy Burnham. It said in an editorial:

“Parents fighting to put food on their table tonight do not need Labour to spend many, many years in the wilderness which followed Michael Foot’s leadership in the 1980s”.

Yvette Cooper criticises Corbyn’s “old solutions to old problems”

cooper

Yvette Cooper, one of Labour’s leadership candidates, has strongly criticised the policies of one of her rivals Jeremy Corbyn and said that he has “old solutions to old problems”.

Cooper said in her speech:

“So tell me what you think is more radical. Bringing back clause IV, spending billions of pounds we haven’t got switching control of some power stations from a group of white middle-aged men in an energy company to a group of white middle-aged men in Whitehall, as Jeremy wants? Or extending Sure Start, giving mothers the power and confidence to transform their own lives and transform their children’s lives for years to come?”.

The comments in Cooper’s speech come shortly after a plea was made by Tony Blair, the former Prime Minister, saying that a Corbyn victory could annihilate the Labour party. The Corbyn team distanced itself from Blair’s comments saying that they wanted a positive campaign but hasn’t yet responded to the speech made by Cooper.

The other two candidates in the Labour leadership race are Liz Kendall and Andy Burnham,

Labour bans 1,200 from voting in leadership election

labour

The Labour Party has confirmed that 1,200 people have been banned from voting in its leadership election. The party has the power to remove anyone who also supports another political party and said more may be removed later.

Among those removed from voting include Ken Loach, the film director who supports Left Unity, Toby Young, a journalist who encouraged others to join the party to vote Corbyn, and Tim Loughton, the Conservative MP for East Worthing and Shoreham.

The party said of those who were banned from voting there were 214 members of the Green Party, 37 from the Trade Union and Socialist Coalition, 13 from the Conservative Party, 7 from UKIP and 1 from the BNP.

The result of the Labour leadership will be announced on 12 September with the four candidates including Andy Burnham, Yvette Cooper, Jeremy Corbyn and Liz Kendall.

Jeremy Corbyn says sections of industry may be nationalised

jc-small

Jeremy Corbyn, one of the four candidates for the Labour leadership, has caused controversy over remarks he made in an interview with the Independent on Sunday over his support for nationalising some companies.

In the interview with the Independent on Sunday Corbyn said:

“I think we should talk about what the objectives of the party are, whether that’s restoring clause IV as it was originally written or it’s a different one”.

The remarks drew criticism from the other leadership candidates, including Liz Kendall who said:

“This shows there is nothing new about Corbyn’s politics. It is just a throwback to the past, not the change we need for our party or our country. We are a party of the future not a preservation society”.

The other two candidates for the leadership, Yvette Cooper and Andy Burnham, also criticised Corbyn’s comments. Cooper said:

“I want Britain to double its investment in science to create 2m more hi-tech manufacturing jobs. We should be working in partnership with business, not spending billions of pounds we haven’t got buying businesses out”.