Ed Vaizey Stands Down from the House of Commons

Ed Vaizey, the Conservative MP for Wantage, has confirmed that he will not be standing at the 2019 General Election. Vaizey had lost the party whip in September 2019 when he voted against the Government on a Brexit vote, but the whip had been restored and it had been thought that he would stand again.

Vaizey said in his resignation letter to Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister:

“I believe now is the right time to move on because I am passionate about the arts, our creative industries and technology and I want to specialise in these sectors. They will, I believe, play an ever more important role in our national life and it is here that I want to focus my energies.”

He added:

“Let me make one thing clear. I am and will remain an enthusiastic supporter of you as our Prime Minister.”

Broadland MP Keith Simpson Confirms Constituency Association Knew About Nick Conrad’s Past

Keith Simpson, the out-going Conservative MP for Broadland, has said that the local party and members were aware of past comments made by Nick Conrad before he was selected by the party to stand in the constituency at the General Election. Simpson also said that Conrad had been asked to step down by the Conservative Party.

Conrad,  a professional broadcaster, justified rape on a radio show, saying:

“Women also have to understand that when a man’s given certain signals he’ll wish to act upon them and if you don’t wish to give out the wrong signals it’s best, probably, to keep your knickers on and not get into bed with him.”

Simpson said in an interview with the EDP:

“There is no doubt in my mind that Nick was told he must stand down. It was the accumulation of several bad headlines at the start of the campaign on other issues and of course Boris Johnson’s problem with women.”

Simpson added:

“When Nick stood I thought back to what had been said five years ago but my view was that he had apologised profusely and the BBC had not sacked him of course. He was asked about the comments and replied very well.”

Conrad said in his resignation statement:

“Five years ago I made ill-judged comments during an on-air radio discussion for which I made a genuine and heartfelt apology. Last night I was honoured to be made the Conservative candidate for Broadland and had hoped to become the MP for a constituency which is close to my heart. However it has become clear to me that the media attention on my previous comments have become a distraction.”

Jess Phillips, the Labour MP for Birmingham Yardley, said:

“It’s best to keep your knickers on to avoid rape according to this dude. I find it’s best avoided by never coming in to contact with misogynistic men who have no understanding of consent.”

Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister, also condemned the comments which Conrad had made, saying that they were “completely unacceptable”.

Boris Johnson’s Pledge to Leave EU on 31 October is Scrapped

Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister, has confirmed that his pledge to leave the European Union won’t be met on 31 October 2019 and the country will remain for a longer period. A spokesperson for the European Union has granted a three-month extension period, which Donald Tusk, the EU Council President, has called a “Flextension”.

Johnson had said during the Conservative Party leadership hustings that he would ensure that the country would leave the EU on 31 October 2019. In early September 2019, Johnson added that “I’d rather be dead in a ditch than agree a Brexit extension”. Downing Street confirmed today that there would now be a Brexit extension, but blamed Parliament for not helping the Prime Minister to deliver it.

Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn Fail to Agree on Brexit Strategy

Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister, met with Jeremy Corbyn, the Leader of the Opposition, today in a bid to resolve a future timetabling strategy for Brexit. Johnson, who had pledged that the UK would leave the European Union on 31 October 2019, however failed to reach an agreement on how to progress the current political deadlock.

British Government and European Union Reach a Deal

The British Government and the European Union have reached a deal which will now be put in front of Parliament on Saturday. Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister, and Jean-Claude Juncker, the President of the European Commission, both issued updates on Twitter saying that agreement has been secured.

Boris Johnson posted:

“We’ve got a great new deal that takes back control — now Parliament should get Brexit done on Saturday so we can move on to other priorities like the cost of living, the NHS, violent crime and our environment #GetBrexitDone #TakeBackControl”

Jean-Claude Juncker posted:

“Where there is a will, there is a #deal – we have one! It’s a fair and balanced agreement for the EU and the UK and it is testament to our commitment to find solutions. I recommend that #EUCO endorses this deal.”

Sir John Major Calls on Prime Minister to Apologise Unreservedly

Sir John Major, the Prime Minister from 1990 until 1997, has called upon Boris Johnson, the current Prime Minister, to return to the House of Commons and offer an unreserved apology. Johnson, who unlawfully advised the Monarch to prorogue Parliament, is expected to return back to the UK early from New York.

Major said in a statement:

“Parliament must now be recalled immediately to recommence its work, and to receive the Prime Minister’s unreserved apology.

I hope this ruling from the Supreme Court will deter any future Prime Minister from attempting to shut down Parliament, with the effect of stifling proper scrutiny and debate, when its sitting is so plainly in the national interest.

No Prime Minister must ever treat the Monarch or Parliament in this way again.”

Boris Johnson Refuses to Resign Over Causing Constitutional Crisis

Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister, has said that he will not be resigning following his unlawful request to prorogue Parliament, which has triggered a constitutional crisis. The Prime Minister is expected to return to the UK early in an attempt to repair the damage to the Government’s reputation.

Speaking in New York, the Prime Minister said:

“Obviously this is a verdict that we will respect and we respect the judicial process. I have to say that I strongly disagree with what the justices have found.”

Jeremy Corbyn, the Leader of the Opposition, said in a statement:

“A Labour government would want to be held to account. We wouldn’t bypass democracy. And I invite Boris Johnson, in the historic words, to consider his position.”

Jo Swinson, the Leader of the Liberal Democrats, said on Twitter:

“The Prime Minister must resign to make way for an emergency Government that can stop a No Deal Brexit. The @LibDems will keep fighting for People’s Vote and to stop Brexit altogether.”

Nicola Sturgeon, the Scottish First Minister, said in a statement:

“It is unthinkable given the rules of democracy and accountability that has been found to have acted unlawfully and is subject of that kind of judgement delivered today would stay in office.”

Mark Drakeford, the Welsh First Minister, said in a statement:

“The Prime Minister has been found to have acted unlawfully and in a way deliberately designed to subvert our democracy. How does anybody in that position think that they can carry on?”

Liz Saville Roberts, the leader of Plaid Cymru at Westminster, said in a statement:

“Boris Johnson has already driven a bulldozer through the constitution, so no longer are ideas like impeachment far-fetched. I will tell other opposition party leaders, we need to be ready to impeach Boris Johnson if he breaks the law.”

Prime Minister’s Future Uncertain as Supreme Court Confirms Prorogation was Unlawful

Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister, acted unlawfully in proroguing Parliament the Supreme Court has announced. The Prime Minister is now under intense pressure to resign, although he had earlier indicated that he didn’t currently intend to do so.

The court decided that Johnson acted illegally and has reversed the prorogation of Parliament, leaving the decision on what to do now to the Speaker of the House of Commons. The decision stated that Johnson’s advice to the Monarch was “unlawful, void and of no effect”.

The President of the Supreme Court,  Lady Hale, said on Johnson’s unlawful advice:

“The effect on the fundamentals of our democracy was extreme.”

Serious Financial Allegations Made About Boris Johnson

Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister, has refused to comment on serious financial allegations which have been made against him by the Sunday Times with regards to Jennifer Arcuri. Arcuri was given public funds when Johnson was the Mayor of London in what is potentially a conflict of interest.

Jon Trickett, the Labour MP for Hemsworth and Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office, said in a statement:

“With Boris Johnson refusing to answer questions about these allegations of serious conflicts of interest, abuse of power and misuse of public funds, the Cabinet Secretary should launch an investigation.

Despite what his life of privilege has led him to believe, Johnson is not above the law and cannot duck and dodge responsibility. This is a matter of the integrity of the Prime Minister, who appears to think he can get away with anything”.

When asked by journalists today about the situation, the Prime Minister refused to comment.

Grant Shapps, the Secretary of State for Transport, rejected the criticisms, saying on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme:

“British companies and entrepreneurs go on trade missions. It’s quite right and proper and I’m sure that’s exactly what’s happened there”.

Sadiq Khan, the current Mayor of London, has said that he will be looking into the allegations and will comment shortly.