Prime Minister Meets with Australian Prime Minister

Boris Johnson, the Prime Minister, has met with Scott Morrison, the Australian Prime Minister, at the G7 today. They discussed matters of interest to the two countries, including international security and global trade.

A spokesperson for the Prime Minister said:

“The leaders discussed their enthusiasm for an enhanced and deep trading relationship once the UK leaves the EU. The Prime Minister set out the increase in the UK’s diplomatic presence in the Pacific, which Prime Minister Morrison welcomed.

The two leaders were concerned about the current situation in Hong Kong, and agreed that it was paramount for all sides to remain calm and peaceful and to maintain Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy as guaranteed by the legally binding Joint Declaration.”

Theresa May Speaks to New Australian Prime Minister

Theresa May, the Prime Minister, has today spoken by phone to Scott Morrison, the new Prime Minister of Australia. Morrison, who becomes the country’s 30th Prime Minister, is the leader of the Liberal Party and replaces Malcolm Turnbull.

A spokesperson for Theresa May said:

This morning the Prime Minister spoke to the new Prime Minister of Australia Scott Morrison.

“Prime Minister May congratulated Prime Minister Morrison on his new role, and they agreed to work together to continue to build on the close partnership between the UK and Australia, particularly on trade and economic issues.

They also discussed the importance of continued close cooperation on foreign and security policy and the Prime Minister thanked Australia for being an important ally in the aftermath of nerve agent use in Salisbury and for their commitment to the Chemical Weapons Convention.

They looked forward to keeping in close touch in the period ahead and meeting in the future.”

Prime Minister Talks to Malcolm Turnbull, Australian Premier, On Salisbury Attack

Theresa May, the Prime Minister, has spoken to Malcolm Turnbull, the Prime Minister of Australia, by phone over the Salisbury attack, which has been attributed to the Russians. The Australian Premier gave his support to the UK and also condemned the attack which had taken place.

A spokesperson for the Prime Minister said:

“The Prime Minister spoke to the Prime Minister of Australia, Malcolm Turnbull, this morning about the attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter and the reckless endangerment of the British public through the use of a military grade nerve agent developed by Russia.

Prime Minister Turnbull said he joined the Prime Minister in her condemnation of the appalling act and expressed his complete solidarity with the UK and its response to the attack.

The Prime Minister explained how she had visited the site at Salisbury yesterday and reiterated how the act represented an unlawful use of force by the Russian state against the UK.

On the UK’s response, she explained how it will expel 23 Russian diplomats who have been identified as undeclared Russian intelligence officers, develop new legislative powers to harden our defences against such hostile activity and suspend all planned high-level contacts between the UK and the Russian Federation.

She thanked Prime Minister Turnbull for his strong support and they agreed on the importance of the international community coming together to take a stand against this despicable act”.

Australia Prime Minister Supports UK Remaining in the EU

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter and Australia's Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull pose for a photo together at Pentagon on Jan. 18, 2016. (DoD photo by U.S. Army Sgt. First Class Clydell Kinchen)(Released)

Malcolm Turnbull, the Australian Prime Minister, has indicated his support for the UK staying in the EU.

Talking to Sky News, Turnbull said:

“Britain’s involvement in the European Union does provide us – and Australian firms particularly, many of whom are based in the UK – considerable access to that market.

From our point of view it is an unalloyed plus for Britain to remain in the EU but I stress it is a matter for the British people and whatever judgment they make, the relations between Britain and Australia will always be very, very close”.

The Vote Leave campaign said:

“If we vote Leave will Britain take back control of its ability to strike deals with countries like Australia instead of leaving it in the hands of Brussels bureaucrats”.